Archive for April, 2010

Thank You Costco Taster People–Flax Topped Yogurt

Photo credit: noramunro

Thanks to the folks in hairnets my kids have tried all sorts of new-to-them foods while walking the aisles at Costco. Lobster bisque, buffalo sausage, chocolate truffles (well, they really didn’t need much encouragement to try chocolate, but my thanks all the same).

A few weeks back we happened on a sample of yogurt topped with ground flax seed next to the cereal aisle. Already a flax fan—the nutty flavor packs a healthy double punch of fiber and omega-3 fats—I mix it into cookies, bread, waffles, pretty much any baked good. I’d never thought of offering it straight to my kiddos. They loved it.

Now, I put a tupperware container of flax in the fridge right next to the 32-ounce tub of yogurt (Mountain High strawberry is my favorite; I’ll choose it over ice cream any day). My middle child dishes out a few scoops of yogurt then tops it with flax as a snack just about every day after school.

Have the samples at Costco driven your kids to try something new…and like it?

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Culinary Confession: Canned Tomatillos

Tomatillos

Photo credit: tokyofoodcast

Tomatillos. The bright, green little veggies wrapped in a papery husk taste almost like the cross between a tomato and a lime. Around our house we use them all the time–tossed in chili, whipped into a salsa verde, blended to create a green enchiladas sauce. But truth be told tomatillos stink. Literally. The paper husk smells like rotting dirty socks. When you have to go through a whole pile of them at the grocery store you’re likely to come away with stinky fingers. Plus, using fresh tomatillos right often requires a few steps like boiling or roasting.

On a whim, years ago, I bought canned tomatillos for a recipe that called for pounds of the little greenies. I just couldn’t bring myself to pick out and roast fresh ones so I thought I’d take a little recipe shortcut, just this once. The recipe turned out perfectly. Since then, I’ve been bypassing the produce aisle for the canned variety of tomatillos. There so convenient and quick. I still buy and stink up my fingers to create fresh tomatillo salsas, but for everyday use, I go for the cans.

It’s not just convenience that compels me to go for the can, tomatillos aren’t always available fresh, but you can usually find the cans year round at Krogers in the ethnic foods section. Anyone else hooked on canned tomatillos?

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Q&A with The Henry Ford’s Head Chef, Nick Seccia

Oven-Seared Amish-Raised Chicken Chop
Decadent & creative

Fiddling in the kitchen one day, The Henry Ford’s Executive Chef, Nick Seccia, dreamed up one of his signature creations—a flavor-infused chicken breast modeled after a pork chop. Using fresh herbs grown at the Greenfield Village (the historic town which is part of the museum’s property) and animals raised on local farms, Chef Nick concocted the inventive dish. Did I mention that the chicken breast is wrapped in bacon?

Buying local not only helps support Michigan’s economy, explains Chef Nick, but it’s also good for the environment too. And there’s an even better reason why Chef Nick uses local ingredients in his professional kitchen and in his home—it tastes better. For home cooks, Chef Nick suggests getting to know the farmers’ markets in your area. He’s also a regular at the Eastern Market in Detroit. “I remember how exciting it was to go there as a child,” recalls Chef Nick, who grew up in Novi and Gaylord. “It’s really coming back. It’s a lively, happening place now with lots of great, local vendors.”

Below Chef Nick, who regularly creates everything from 5-course meals for high-end events to finger foods for visiting school groups to menus for the museum’s on-site eateries, shares some insights into his cooking style. He also passed along the recipe for his Oven-Seared, Amish-Raised Chicken “Chop” with Morel Sauce.

What three ingredients do you always keep stocked in your pantry?
It’s tough to choose just three. But, I’d have to say veal stock, fresh herbs and butter. Real butter.

What is your favorite meal to make or eat?
Anything braised. I like dishes where the meat has been seared and then cooked for a long time so that it just becomes tender.

We all have a favorite indulgence, for a foodie like you it must be something spectacular?
Chocolate. I like ganaches (smooth, creamy chocolate sauce or frosting) that are made with a high percentage of chocolate.

What’s one of your worst cooking mistakes?
I learned how to cook first and when you’re cooking you create dishes using your eyes and your palette. I tried to do the same with baking. Now this was a long time ago, but I made this cake without measuring any ingredients. I can’t even remember what kind of cake it was supposed to be–it was just terrible.

There are so many great Michigan-made food products, what is your pick?
Real Michigan maple syrup.

What do you suggest for first-timers to The Henry Ford? What menu item should they make sure to try?
At the Eagle Tavern, we make our own sausage. We use Berkshire hogs. And these hogs are raised exclusively on apple pulp. It’s something you won’t find anywhere else.

If you’d like a taste of Chef Nick’s culinary creations, you can head to The Henry Ford in Dearborn and try any of the eateries there, or you can master one of his dishes at home.

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Oven-Seared Amish-Raised Chicken “Chop” with Morel Sauce

Oven-Seared Amish-Raised Chicken Chop
Decadent & creative

Oven Seared Amish Raised Chicken “Chop” with Morel Sauce
Nick Seccia CEC
Serves 6

Chicken Chop
Ingredients

6 Airline cut Amish raised chicken breast 6-8oz ea
6 Slices thick cut hickory smoked bacon
1/4 Cup pure olive oil
2 Cloves garlic peeled
2 Tablespoons fresh parsley
2 Tablespoon fresh thyme
2 Tablespoons fresh basil leaves
2 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 Tablespoon organic apple cider vinegar
1/2 Tablespoon Kosher salt
1/2 Tablespoon ground black pepper
Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients except chicken and bacon, puree in a blender
  2. Remove the meat and skin from around the bone on the chicken
  3. Pour marinade over the chicken and marinate overnight
  4. Place chicken skin side down flat with the bone pointing away from you then roll the thin edge towards the chicken until rolled into a chop shape
  5. Stand chicken up so the bone is straight up then wrap the bacon around the bottom
  6. Roast at 350F for about 35 to 40 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through
  7. Serve with morel sauce

Morel Sauce
Ingredients

1 cup fresh Morel mushrooms sliced in half lengthwise and cleaned
1 large shallot minced
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 tablespoons brandy
1 cup roasted veal stock reduced from 2 cups
1/4 cup heavy cream
Kosher salt and ground black pepper as needed
Directions

  1. Saute the mushrooms and shallots in butter until the shallots are clear and the mushrooms are tender
  2. Add the brandy and reduce until almost dry
  3. Add the stock and heavy cream reduce until thickened
  4. Season with salt and pepper
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Impress-Your-Guests Chocolate Bread Pudding

Before I knew better, pudding was something that came in either little 4-pack containers or in a powder packet inside a box. That was until I tried bread pudding. The savory-sweet combination of warm, eggy bread pieces infused with cinnamon and butter gave the dish a feeling of dessert French toast. Then I stumbled across a recipe for bread pudding that added another layer of flavor—chocolate—and I was hooked. Toss in some walnuts and that’s a perfect dessert (I like anything with walnuts in it).

Making bread pudding is easy. Plus, you can use up any of the bread that you might have lying around, getting dried out to make this recipe (the more dried out, the better). While you can serve this dish warm to guests, I like to bake it ahead of time and serve it chilled. The chocolate flavor gets more intense once the bread has had time to fully soak in the flavors.

The chocolate bread pudding works best with a heartier white bread. This is one of the few times I wouldn’t suggest going the whole wheat route. Even doing a half-and-half combo yields a too-chewy pudding (trust me, I’ve tried it). I like using my own baked bread for this recipe (or if I don’t have any handy, I opt for buttermilk bread from the store).

There’s a few ways that you can bake the bread pudding. To really impress guests, I’ll often make individual portions. I divide the batter equally into 6, 7-ounce ramekins and serve the dessert in the dish with fresh whipped cream on top dusted with a little cocoa powder. If I’m in a hurry, I bake the batter in a 9-inch springform pan or even an 8-inch square baking dish. Either way, I’d recommend keeping your slices small—this is one rich dish.

I like to dress up my plate to make the dessert look restaurant-worthy–it’s so simple and fun to do anyway. First, I use a large-sized plate (I bought mine at IKEA) then I use chocolate syrup (Hershey’s is fine; it’s not for the taste, it’s for the wow factor) to create a design on the plate. Then, I put a slice of chocolate bread pudding in the center, top it with fresh whipped cream (again, dusted with cocoa powder). I like to add fresh fruit too—raspberries, strawberries, mangoes.

Chocolate Bread Pudding Recipe

Prep time: 20 minutes (plus time to dry out bread)

Cook time: 1 hour

Servings: 6-8

Ingredients

2 ¼ cups semi-sweet chocolate chips

1 cup brown sugar

1 stick butter

2 cups milk

2 eggs

2 teaspoons vanilla

¾ teaspoon salt

1 ½ loaves white bread

2 teaspoons Espresso powder (optional)

Chocolate Bread Pudding

Top off your bread pudding with some fresh whipped cream!

Cut your bread into 1 to 1/2 –inch cubes. Spread out the cubes on a large cookie baking sheet. Let the cubes dry out for a day or two. Alternatively, you can dry out the cubes in about an hour by putting them in the oven at 200 degrees Fahrenheit.

Once your cubes are ready, it’s time to start getting the rest of your ingredients prepped. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. In a large glass mixing bowl or measuring cup melt the chocolate, butter and sugar together in the microwave. Set the microwave for 1 minute at half power and then stir the mixture until smooth. If the chocolate is still not melted, put it back into the microwave for another 20 to 30 seconds at half power.

Let the chocolate mixture cool while you prepare the other ingredients. In a large mixing bowl whip together the eggs, milk, vanilla, salt, and Espresso powder (you can also use cocoa powder). Add the bread cubes into the egg mixture and carefully stir the bread into the milk with a wooden spoon. Fold the ingredients together until the bread looks like it’s soaked in most of the liquid. Slowly pour the chocolate mixture into the soaked bread cubes. Do not over stir!

Use cooking spray to coat your baking dish. Pour the batter into the dish and bake for 1 hour. Start checking the bread pudding at about 45 minutes into baking. The top will appear shiny and should be firm to the touch. Allow the dish to cool at least 10 to 15 minutes before serving.

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A Taste of Hungary: Crockpot Paprika Chicken and Spaetzle Noodles

Hungarian chicken and spaetzle

I topped my dish with fresh chives.

There’s something so soothing about a noodle. No wonder it gets a starring roll in chicken noodle soup. Flat noodles, thick noodles, stringy noodles, I love them all–and so do my kids!

But one noodle in particular has my middle daughter tossing the fork and grabbing a spoon to scoop piles of noodles from her plate into her mouth, and that’s spaetzle. You may not have heard of this soft, eggy dumpling-like noodle that’s common in Austria, Germany and Hungary. I hadn’t until I travelled there as a college kid. Once I tried it, every restaurant I went to, I’d ask for it.

Now spaetzle are pretty easy to make (no more time really than making a batch of muffins), but they do require some special equipment. The trick with spaetzle is that you make an egg based, loose dough that you then drop through holes into boiling water. They sink to the bottom first then rise up as they cook. I’ve seen some recipes where you simply drop the dough in heaps into a soup or stew to cook it. That makes for some large dough balls that don’t resemble the more delicate, kid-friendly version we make at our house.

Spaetzle makers are surprisingly easy to find (if you know where to look)—and they’re not expensive. I found mine at Bed, Bath & Beyond for around $10. It looks like some sort of defunct cheese grater—there’s a long silver piece with holes the width of an upright pencil and on top of that is a square basket that glides back and forth. I’m not convinced the store person would know what it is if you asked, so here’s a picture of a spaetzle maker.

I pair my spaetzle with either a beef stroganoff, or the traditional paprika chicken. I keep my chicken prep simple, since I know I’ll be spending some time on the pasta—I use my crockpot start to finish. Unless, that is, I want to make the sauce a little fancier. Then I strain the juices from the crockpot and replace it for the milk in my béchamel sauce recipe. Putting the plate together, I put a generous scoop of spaetzle and some pieces of melt-in-your-mouth chicken and top it with some of the crockpot juice (or sauce) and a little heavy cream. Normally, I’d substitute sour cream thinned with a little milk for the heavy cream, but this recipe tastes so much better with a little cream (and hey, it’s more authentic that way).

So if your kiddos are itching to try something new and they’re already noodle fans, these spaetzle are sure to be a hit.

Crockpot Hungarian Chicken

Ingredients

2 pounds chicken (boneless, skinless)

1 14.5-ounce can tomato chunks

1 1/2 tablespoons paprika

1 onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

½ cup chicken broth (or water)

½ teaspoon white pepper (optional)

½ teaspoon nutmeg (optional)

¼ teaspoon cayenne powder (optional, but it will give it a little kick)

Salt to taste (at the end of cooking)

Directions

Place chicken breasts (fresh or frozen) at the bottom of the crockpot pan. Drain half of the liquid from the tomatoes, then pour the remaining liquid and tomatoes into the crockpot along with the rest of the ingredients (except the salt). Cook until the chicken falls apart.

You can scoop some of the cooking liquid into a mixer and blend to make a sauce, or serve as is. You may want to add more paprika and/or salt.

Spaetzle

There are a variety of different spaetzle recipes, but this one is my favorite.

Ingredients

3 cups flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 cup milk

3 eggs

¼ teaspoon nutmeg (optional)

Directions

Fill a medium-sized pasta pan with water (check that your spaetzle maker fits comfortably on the top of the pan before choosing it). Turn the stovetop on to medium-high heat so that the water comes to a rapid boil.

Mix the eggs until well blended then add milk, then your dry ingredients (note: I try to have the eggs and milk at room temperature for easier mixing). The dough batter will be sticky. Place the spaetzle maker onto the pan and over the boiling water. Fill the spaetzle basket halfway with dough. Slid the basket back and forth over the water so that the dough drops into the water. Once all the dough is out of the basket remove the spaetzle maker. Using a slotted spoon skim the pasta from the top of the water and place into a strainer. Repeat with the remaining dough. You’ll probably have about three batches. Toss in a little butter, and keep warm until you’re ready to serve.

Additional note: Don’t let the dough harden onto the spaetzle maker or your pasta pan—clean right away with hot water and soap.

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Thank you Zoe Francois–Whole Wheat Chocolate Bread

Whole Wheat Chocolate Bread

My favorite recipe from Healthy Breads in 5 Minutes a Day

Honestly, I  wasn’t expecting this recipe to turn out, but as I was flipping through bakery goddess, Zoe Francois’s book Healthy Breads in 5 Minutes a Day, I kept coming back to the recipe for Chocolate Expresso Whole Wheat Bread (p. 301). I couldn’t resist. Dark chocolate and whole wheat. Good for you dessertesque bread, I had to try it.

A foodie blogger buddy of mine, Stephanie Stiavetti, first introduced me to Zoe Francois (and I should mention her co-author Jeff Hertzberg) through a post on gluten-free brioche. The idea of good-for-you, easy-to-make breads got my hands itching for some flour.

Making the bread was even easier than I expected. Your food processor will do most of the work. I opted for some rich, dark Ghirardelli hot chocolate instead of Expresso, but I also added in a bit of Black Onyx Powder, a super-concentrated bit of chocolate magic I get at Savory Spice Shop. You literally pour the dough from the food processor into a bowl for it to rise. I let my dough marinate in the fridge for awhile–per Zoe’s suggestion. On day two (I couldn’t wait any longer!) I baked up the loaf. The dense, flavorful bread was an immediate favorite with my kids. My oldest topped hers with raspberry jam. I kept it simple with a little butter. Next time, I’d try adding dried tart cherries and or walnuts into the dough too (I think Zoe would approve). I also skimped on the raw sugar on top for some reason. I’d definitely be more generous with the sugar when I make the bread again (soon). If you’re looking to combine some serious chocolate with whole wheat thrown in (so you can technically call it a healthy snack), I’d recommend this recipe. As far as I can tell, the recipe isn’t available at Zoe’s blog, but I found an excerpt at TalkFood.

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Q&A with The Fly Trap’s Kara McMillian

The Fly Trap's Red Chile Salmon Burger

A creamy combo of cheddar, smoked Gouda, and Blue cheeses mixed in with the trademark elbow macaroni, then topped with caramelized onions. Is your mouth watering yet? That’s the description of The Fly Trap’s 3 Cheese and Mac. I’ve had friends go in and order this dish planning on eating about a third of it at the diner and then snacking on the rest for a week afterwards.

Located in Ferndale, The Fly Trap’s notoriety for serving classic dishes alongside funky favorites like Asian pho bowls and tofu fried rice have made it not only a hit among locals, but even the Food Network has featured its fixins’ on Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-ins and Dives (that’s where I first heard about it).

Kara McMillian and her brother Sean McClanaghan, are the co-owners of the popular dining spot. Kara’s husband, Gavin, is the brain (and head chef!) behind the eclectic, mouth-watering menu. Here, she spills on her favorite ingredients—and her go-to dish when she dines at work.

What three ingredients do you always keep stocked in your pantry?

I love cooking with spice. Big flavors are what set us apart. That’s our biggest complaint when we have new guests come to the restaurant–we like to add a little spice to our dishes. At home we always have Sambal Oelek, which is a Vietnamese red chili paste, on hand. Olive oil. Locally made tofu.

Your favorite meal?

My favorite meal on the menu is the fried rice. We use short grain brown rice, tons of roasted eggplant and red pepper; shiitake, cremini and oyster mushrooms; carrots; sugar snap peas; fresh spinach; and a splash of chili paste. It’s so good with lots of veggies and whole grain rice. Mmmm. It’s something that I like to have to take home with me.

We all have a favorite indulgence, for a foodie like you it must be something spectacular?

I recently took up making desserts. I used recipes from Baked, which is from a bakery in New York City. Their brownies are absolutely spectacular. I get requests for pans and more pans. The key is there’s the smallest amount of espresso powder in the brownies and that turns the corner with the flavor—they are super rich.

What’s one of your worst cooking mistakes?

I made a whole batch of cookies once and let people eat them without trying them myself. They had way too much flour and baking soda in them.

There are so many great Michigan-made food products, what is your pick?

Tofu. We buy our tofu from Michigan Soy Products in Royal Oak. It’s a really good product. We also get fresh fruit and fresh-squeezed juices from the Western Market right here in Ferndale.

What do you suggest for first-timers to The Fly Trap? What menu item should they make sure to try?

There are two categories of first timers. For a real crowd-pleaser, I would suggest the Charmoula Chicken, which is a North African spiced chicken breast, jack cheese, caramelized onion on grilled sourdough with a lemon, garlic aioli. But for those who are a little more adventurous, I’d recommended the Vietnamese pho bowl, which is a really brothy, spicy dish that has your choice of tofu or chicken, rice and tons of veggies. On a cold day, it’s really heartwarming.

If you’d like to get a taste of The Fly Trap at home, McMillian graciously shared her recipe the Red Chili Salmon burger.

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Dirty Cakes Your Kids will Love

“You can eat the whole thing—except the flowers and the pot,” my nine-year-old daughter explained with a smile when we dropped off a little treat at her friend’s house. “It’s a dirt cake!” Her mom seemed to pick up on the joke right away, but my daughter’s buddy looked a little puzzled. “It’s Oreo soil,” giggled my daughter.

Her friend seemed confused still, “I can eat this?”

“Yup,” answered my daughter. That’s right—we’ve been doing a little planting around my house. With the warmer temperatures, and April Fool’s Day as an excuse, we decided to make some dirt cakes to give to my kids’ friends. Dirt cakes are fun and easy to either make with your kids—or to create to play a joke on your kids. This time, I let me kids in on the silliness. When I explained to my crew that we were going to put together dirt cakes, they weren’t sure what to make of it, until my 9-year-old spotted the Oreos. She didn’t care what we were making as long as Oreos were involved.

Making dirt cakes is easy. Pick up a new planting pot at the hardware store, cut up pieces of chocolate cake to place in the bottom, then add a layer of chocolate pudding, and then insert either fresh (stems wrapped in tin foil) or artificial flowers into the center of the pot. Then sprinkle ground up Oreos (the “dirt”) and gummy worms at the top of the pot. If you need more detailed instructions, see below.

Child eating dirt cake

Don't forget to add some "worms" into your dirt cake!

Child making dirt cake

Adding dirt...

Children with dirt cakes

Dirt cakes ready for delivery!

.

This time, we chose individual servings, but if you really want to fool your kids, buy a large potting plant and add your cake ingredients to create a centerpiece for your kitchen table. Then, once you’ve eaten your dinner explain to the kids that you’re still really hungry. You can then start taking nibbles at the planting soil and dare your kids to join you. Older kids might already guess your rouse, but younger ones will be amazed that mom is a dirt eater.

If you miss getting in on the fun for April 1st, don’t worry, maybe the Easter Bunny will leave your kids a special plant…

We had so much fun putting these cakes together my kids are already asking when we’re going to do it again.

“Dirt” Cake Instructions

Supplies:

Several small flowerpots or one large one

1 chocolate cake mix, cooked according to directions in a 9×13” pan

1 chocolate pudding mix, put together according to directions

15-20 Oreo cookies, crushed

1 package gummy worms

Artificial or real flowers

Aluminum foil

Directions:

Wash and dry thoroughly all of your flowerpots. Cut the chocolate cake into large chunks. Places several pieces into your flowerpot until it is 2/3 full. Heap several spoonfuls of pudding into the flowerpot to cover the cake pieces entirely. Wrap the bottom of your flowers with tin foil. Poke a hole into the center of the cake/pudding using a chopstick. Place the flowers into the hole you created. Sprinkle crushed Oreos and gummy worms around the flowers.

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The Fly Trap’s Red Chile Salmon Burgers

Recipe for Red Chile Salmon Burger

provided by Kara McMillian


Makes 8, 6 oz. Patties

3lbs. Salmon Meat

1 Tablespoon Sambal Oelek

1 Tablespoon Black Sesame Seeds

1 Tablespoon Soy Sauce

1 Cup Chopped Green Onion

Grind all of the above in a food processor.  Sautee in skillet, or char-grill, in 1 Tablespoon Olive oil over medium heat, flipping once until desired temperature. Enjoy!

The Fly Trap’s Red Chile Salmon Burger
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