Posts tagged chef

White Gull Inn Breakfast Rice Pudding

White Gull Inn in the wintertime Photo credit: White Gull Inn

A special thanks to Julie Zak, the Breakfast Chef and Kitchen Manager at the White Gull Inn for providing this recipe. The White Gull Inn is located in Fish Creek, part of Wisconsin’s picturesque Door County area.

Recipe

Yield: 6 servings


Ingredients

4 cups cooked basmati rice

1 lb. frozen peaches, thawed and coarsely chopped

1 cup pitted, frozen tart cherries, thawed and drained

1 cup heavy whipping cream

½ cup brown sugar, divided

¼ cup rolled oats

¼ cup shredded, sweetened coconut

¼ cup chopped pecans

¼ cup (½ stick) butter, melted

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spray a 1 ½ quart casserole dish with non-stick cooking spray.
  2. Combine rice, peaches, cherries, whipping cream and ¼ cup of the brown sugar in a large bowl. Spoon mixture into prepared dish.
  3. In a small bowl, mix remaining ¼ cup brown sugar, rolled oats, coconut, pecans and melted butter; sprinkle over rice mixture. Bake uncovered 25-30 minutes, or until top is golden brown.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Fagioli Calabrese from Compari’s on the Park

Compari’s on the Park chef, Tony Yaquinto, shared his restaurant’s favorite recipe for fagioli calabrese.

Recipe
Ingredients

2 Tbs julienne fennel
2 Tbs julienne hungarian pepper (hot)
1 Link Hot Italian Sausage (cooked & chopped)
1 Tbs roasted red pepper
pinch chopped fresh garlic
3 Tbs butter beans
1 Cup fresh spinach
1/8 cup chicken stock
1/8 cup white wine (substitute: white grape juice)
2 cups cooked tubetti pasta
1 Tbs butter
1 Tbs grated Parmesan cheese
Directions

  1. Saute fennel, hungarian pepper and italian sausage in canola oil, cook until the veggies are tender.
    Add roasted red peppers, garlic, beans, and spinach, then cook till beans are hot and spinach cooks down.
  2. Deglaze the pan with chicken stock and white wine (or white grape juice).
  3. Simmer for 2 minutes. Add pasta, butter, and Parmesan cheese; simmer till creamy.
  4. Top with fresh Parmesan cheese and cracked black pepper (or crushed red pepper).
  5. Enjoy this Southern italian favorite with fresh Italian bread with butter.

Keep reading during MKES’s Chef Week, tomorrow I’ll be starting a cool giveaway!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chef Q&A with Tony Yaquinto from Compari’s on the Park

It’s Chef Week at MyKidsEatSquid. I’ll be featuring Chef Q&As, along with their favorite recipes all week. Look for a great giveaway coming up Wednesday too!

First up, Tony Yaquinto, head chef at Compari’s on the Park in Plymouth, Michigan. He’s the first chef who has pointed out using a special ingredient I’ve discovered from Mexican cooking, Maggi sauce, which has the depth of soy sauce without being overpowering (I’ll have to post on the miracle of Maggi sauce another time). On to Chef Yaquinto…


What three ingredients do you always keep stocked in your pantry?

I would like to say onion, chicken stock and kosher salt. Onion is the base for great soups and sauces and stocks. I use just standard white onions—a lot of them. Kosher salt is what I use to season all my food. And chicken stock, or even vegetable stock, is good for making sauces or even cooking ingredients in when you want to add flavor.

Your favorite meal to make or serve?

Pork tenderloin. Usually when I have family or friends over that’s what I make. It’s inexpensive and easy to prepare. I like to marinate it then grill it. With the marinade I usually put in a little bit of everything—oil, salt, pepper, garlic and I have a spice at home and in the restaurant I use for seasoning called Maggi and I put that in too. I might also rub on brown sugar and mustard to give it a nice crust.

We all have a favorite indulgence, for a chef like you it must be something spectacular?

Once a week I like to have a nice, big breakfast. A couple eggs over easy, bacon or sausage, toast.

What’s one of your worst cooking mistakes?

I do a cooking club here at the restaurant once a month. We meet with some guys that live around town. Once we made a cheesecake and one of the guys used salt instead of sugar–it came out a little bit salty. We always joke about it.

What do you suggest for first-timers to Compari’s on the Park? What menu item should they make sure to try?

I would recommend the fagioli calabrese. This dish is very unique, it’s something we came up with a few years ago and just started playing with since. It has butter beans, banana peppers, chicken stock, Italian sausage, white wine, cheese, and noodles. People may not be familiar with it, but 90% of those who try it fall in love with it.

Tomorrow I’ll pass along the recipe for Chef Yaquinto’s fagioli calabrese pictured above.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Q&A with the Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital’s Top Chef, Frank Turner

Spinach-Blueberry Brownies

Would you choose hospital fare for your next date night? Maybe you should. The Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital, which opened its doors just over a year ago, features not only a restaurant, Henry’s Cafe, where chefs are on hand to craft your meal as you watch, but they also offer a state-of-the-art kitchen demonstration area where you can learn a variety of cooking techniques and nutritional helps to improve what you offer at home.

The chef behind the new concept of tastier, better-for-you hospital food is Frank Turner, a Michigan native and a passionate advocate for locally produced, sustainable products. Chef Turner has a long history in Michigan’s top restaurants as well as volunteering in Detroit-area food kitchens. Today, as the Director of Food and Nutrition and Executive Chef at Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital, Chef Turner is helping patients learn how to choose foods that will help aid in their recovery and he’s lending his expertise to cooking courses offered to the public at the demonstration kitchen. Classes fill up quickly, so enroll early. But to get your own experience with fresh fare, head to Henry’s Café any night of the week or stop by on Wednesdays from 10am to 4pm, when there’s a farmers market open onsite.

What three ingredients do you always keep stocked in your pantry?
Olive oil, quinoa, and dried fruit. I love dried Turkish apricots, as long as they’re sulfate free.

How about your favorite meal?
Chicken dumplings. It’s my grandmother’s recipe and she always served it, and then my mother. You make it by poaching chicken in stock [gently simmering the meat in the flavored liquid]. Then you take out the chicken, pull the meat off the bone and reserve it while you cook the dumplings. Once the dumplings are cooked, you take them off and cook down the broth until it thickens—and there’s your stock. The chicken is always tender. And my mother would serve it with some sort of braised vegetable to the side.

We all have a favorite indulgence, for a foodie like you it must be something spectacular?
Snickers. I don’t have them very often, but I like a great big, king size classic Snickers bar with a glass of milk. But it’s a toss up between that and Tollhouse chocolate chip cookies.

What’s one of your worst cooking mistakes?
I’ve done it all—burnt the soup, opened the blender when it’s going, burned the heck out of myself. The silliest thing I ever did, though, was when I forgot to label some stock [broth] that I made for a sauce that went with a special recipe. It was a short rib lamb dish. I had to get the pieces cut especially for the dish. I had created this stock using boar bones and fowl venison. It was probably the best stock I’ve ever made. Well, someone used it in the soup that day and I didn’t have anything for my special dish so I had to improvise. The dish turned out fine, but I must say that was one really good soup. Great beef barley!

There are so many great Michigan-made food products, what is your pick?
Asparagus. Michigan asparagus has a distinct flavor that you don’t find anywhere else. It has a nutty flavor. I like to grill it and then serve it with cracked pepper, citrus zest and a splash of Manchego or Parmesan cheese.

The American station, burger of the day—you’ll find that it’s never a beef hamburger. It’ll be something besides ground beef—white fish burger or a chickpea burger, quinoa and black bean burger, but it won’t be a ground beef burger. [There are seven chef-manned stations to choose from.]

If you’d like to sample one of Chef Turner’s recipes at home, try putting together his nutritional-packed brownies. The dessert includes a puree of blueberry and spinach for a boost of anti-oxidants that blends perfectly with the intense chocolate flavor.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)