Posts tagged desserts

Fast French Chocolate Mousse

Close up of French Chocolate Mousse

Once a year my mother would make chocolate mousse. It was usually at Christmas time.

 

Well, it’s not Christmas but for Mother’s Day I thought making mom’s mousse recipe would be a fitting way to celebrate. Right now my mom and dad are living abroad at the moment as medical missionaries so communication is with sporadic emails. For Mother’s Day I’m remembering mom by making her mousse recipe. It’s simple – chocolate, heavy cream, eggs (they’re not cooked). My mom always ordered fresh heavy cream for the milk man. I was able to get mine through a special order from my CSA, Fresh Fork Market.

 

 Chocolate Mousse

 

Recipe

Prep time: 10 minutes or less

Servings: About 6

 

Ingredients

6 ozs. semi-sweet chocolate chips

2 1/2 tbsp. water

2 whole eggs, plus 2 egg yolks

1 tsp. vanilla

1/4 cup sugar

1 cup heavy cream

 

Directions

  1. In a glass measuring cup, melt the chocolate chips with water in the microwave. Whisk until smooth and allow to cool.
  2. In a blender, blend together the eggs, vanilla, and sugar for 2 minutes.
  3. Add the cream and blend again for 1 minute.
  4. Add the chocolate mixture into the blender and blend for another minute.
  5. Pour the mousse into 6 glass containers (4-oz. ramekins work well).
  6. Refrigerate overnight and serve with whipped cream and fresh berries.
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Rocky road pizza

When I picked up the phone this afternoon at first I thought something was wrong. On the other end, my mother-in-law just didn’t sound like herself. When I asked what was up, I had to laugh at her response: “Kris, I finally tried Nutella today. It was a-m-a-zing.”

Even though she spent part of her childhood overseas, my mother-in-law had never tried Nutella. She’s hooked now. We talked about all of the ways she could use it, but one of my newly discovered favs has to be rocky road pizza. Bonus: these mini dessert pizzas are fun for kids or grandkids to make!

Recipe

Prep time: 15 minutes + baking

Servings: 4 mini pizzas with 4 slices each


Ingredients

1 package pizza dough

1-1 1/2 cups Nutella

1-2 cups mini marshmallows

1 cup smoked almonds, chopped (optional)

1/2 cup chocolate chips (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking oil.
  3. Divide the dough into four equal pieces and roll each one out to a 6-8-inch circle.
  4. Spread Nutella on each pizza round using a kitchen knife.
  5. Place the mini pizzas onto the baking sheet.
  6. Sprinkle marshmallows, nuts and chocolate chips (if using) on top of the Nutella.
  7. Bake the pizzas for 20 minutes or until the marshmallows become golden.
  8. Cool before slicing.

Kids’ reactions: As you might expect, all of my crew, including Mr. Squid raved about these mini pizzas. We also tried mixing apple slices with Nutella on pizzas too. The pizzas were harder to slice than the rocky road version but at least I felt like they had some nutritional value. I’m thinking when raspberries are in season it would be tasty to spread the pizzas with Nutella and white chocolate chips and once they came out of the oven I’d pop on fresh berries.

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Easy raspberry tart

Raspberry picking. Yes it’s that time of year. Once you’ve had your fill of popping fresh raspberries by the handful, try this easy tart (and yes, I snuck in some blackberries and blueberries too).

You’ll need a tart pan for this recipe—a pie plate just won’t do. You could try using a 9-inch springform pan in a pinch, but once you’ve tried making tarts, my guess is you’ll want to have one on hand anyway. Tart pans aren’t expensive and you can find them at any large home goods store.

You pre-bake the piecrust to keep it from getting soggy once you add the berries. To pre-bake, the oven will need to be at a higher temperature and you’ll also want to add some weight on top of the crust so it doesn’t get air bubbles in the dough. Simply place some heavy-duty aluminum foil on top, along with either uncooked rice or beans and you’re set. (Once you’re done cooking, carefully remove the aluminum foil and pour the beans or rice back into its container once they’ve cooled. You can still use them.)

The berries are the easiest part of the tart: Wash and dry the berries, then mix in cornstarch, sugar, and lemon. I like my tarts, well, tart, so I don’t add in as much sugar as most recipes call for. If you want to increase the sweetness go ahead and double the sugar.

No fresh berries? Don’t worry, this recipe works well with frozen berries too (or do half and half). Thaw the frozen berries and follow the recipe according to the directions.

Raspberry Tart

Tweaked from How to Cook Everything (Wiley, 1998)

Prep time: 15 minutes + baking

Servings: about 8

Ingredients

1 pre-made pie crust (Trader’s Joes is my fave)

¼ cup sugar

¼ cup cornstarch

1 Tablespoon fresh lemon juice

zest from one lemon

3 cups raspberries (fresh or frozen, thawed)

Directions

  1. Lightly coat a tart pan with cooking spray. Lay the dough onto the pan and then press into the edges and up the sides. Trim any excess.
  2. Prick the dough with a fork and then place a piece of aluminum foil on top and weight it with either rice or beans.
  3. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Once heated, cook the crust for about 15 minutes of until barely golden.
  4. Meanwhile, in a mixing bowl stir together sugar and cornstarch. Toss in the raspberries (reserve ¼ cup) and lemon juice and zest.
  5. Mix the berries into the cornstarch/sugar combination. Press the berries with a fork so that some break apart.
  6. Pour the berries into the cooked tart crust. Add the reserved berries on top.
  7. Lower the oven temperature to 350 degrees and cook the tart for another 20-30 minutes, or until the berries’ juices are bubbling.
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Harry Potter sorting hat cookies 2 ways

Sorting hat made with chocolate butter cookie dough

It’s here. The final Harry Potter flick. To celebrate the Friday opening, I’m coming up with Hogwarts-inspired eats all week. First up, sorting hat cookies.

I knew coming up with a cookie that looked like the sorting hat wouldn’t be easy. After all, it needed to be a dark color, 3-dimensional, and have that trademark scowl etched into the folds. Dark chocolate butter cookies. I figured I could work with the dough to shape the hats. My first few attempts yielded several helpful comments from my kids, most along the lines of–”Cool. Are those supposed to be dragon droppings or something, mom?” But hey, it’s the final Harry Potter movie so if it takes a little more time to come up with the perfect sorting hat cookie, that’s okay.

I did come up with a decent looking sorting hat cookie, trouble is, of my cookie batch, only 5 turned out, the rest, well, spread a bit to the point

Photo credit: Wizardinglife.com

that my kids’ comments were pretty accurate. But that’s where a little creativity comes into play. I turned my less impressive cookies into the base of a much simpler, easier version of sorting hats–inverted ice cream cones with melted chocolate chip faces. I’m including detailed instructions if you want to attempt the sorting hat chocolate butter cookies, but if you’re looking for something you can pull together in minutes (or to use your cookies that didn’t turn out) I’ve got those directions first. My kids were more than happy to eat any of my attempts at cookies–you can’t go wrong with Harry Potter-themed sweets.

Check back in Wednesday for a Polyjuice Potion recipe and Friday for a roundup of Harry Potter ideas to cook up.


Ice cream cone 'sorting hat' cookies


Fast & easy sorting hat cookies

Yield: 4 large cookies

Prep time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

4 sugar ice cream cones

4 scoops ice cream

1/4 cups chocolate chips, melted

4 chocolate wafer cookies

Directions

  1. Heat the chocolate chips in a glass dish in the microwave until melted. (At high power, my microwave takes 1 minute.)
  2. Invert the ice cream cones and use a table knife to draw the sorting hat ‘face’ onto the cones. I also dipped the tip of the cone into the chocolate.
  3. Allow to harden–if you use chocolate candy coating this can take minutes, chocolate chips will take around half an hour.
  4. Place the ice cream carefully into each cone and top with the chocolate wafer cookie. (This is where you can use your chocolate butter sorting hat cookies that didn’t quite turn out:)
  5. Service right away!

Chocolate butter sorting hat cookies

*Adapted from King Arthur Flour’s Baking Companion Cookbook

Yield: Depends;)

Prep time: 30 minutes + baking, fridge time

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups flour

Use two circle sizes for the hat

3/4 cocoa (*see note below)

1/2 teaspoon salt

3/4 butter at room temperature (not margarine)

1/4 cup granulated sugar

3/4 cup dark brown sugar

1 egg

1 Tablespoon water

1/2 Tablespoon honey or agave

1/2 teaspoon almond extract (optional)

Directions

  1. Cream the butter and sugars together. I wanted an intense, chewy chocolate cookie that’s why I went with brown sugar in

    Notice the thickness of the cookie and how to cut the circle

    stead of just granulated.

  2. Add the egg, water, honey and extract (if using) to the butter mixture. Blend well.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix together the dry ingredients. *Note: to get the dark color try using Hershey’s special dark cocoa at the grocers or order dark cocoa powder from King Arthur Flour.
  4. Gently mix the dry ingredients gently into the batter just until incorporated.
  5. Place dough on waxed paper, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 4 hours or until solid.
  6. Here’s the tricky part–putting the cookies together: preheat the oven to 300 degrees and line your cookie pans with parchment paper.
  7. Working with 1/3 of the dough at a time and leaving the rest refrigerated, roll out the dough, using flour and a rolling pin, to 1/4″ thick. The object here is to keep the cookies AS COLD AS POSSIBLE so they don’t melt much when you cook them.

    Roll the dough inward at least 3 times and make it as high as possible (it'll shrink)

  8. Use a small circle as the base of the hat (I used a spice container lid) and a larger circle (cups work well) to construct the hat.
  9. Place the small circle on the cookie sheet. With the larger circle, make one cut toward the center (pictured). Roll this part inward so that it resembles a cone or Christmas tree. Place it on the smaller base. Don’t worry about pressing it in, as it cooks, it will come together.
  10. With a spoon, make the sorting hat face. Place the cookies into the fridge for 15 minutes (or more) before baking.
  11. Bake the cookies for 8 minutes and then check on them. I indented the face again part way through cooking. Bake another 3-5 minutes until just done.
  12. Remove the pan and allow the cookies to cool ON the pan. Again, you can use the spoon to shape the face; the cookies will harden as they cool.

Shaped sorting hats ready to go into the oven

Early attempts at sorting hats that fell flat--but still tasted good!

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BEST brownies ever

I’ve been meaning to pass along this recipe for awhile now but it seemed like the right timing with Memorial Day this weekend (knockout picnic treat anyone?) and school coming to an end. Not only are these the BEST brownies, but my youngest daughter has a chocoholic teacher so I’m planning on making a batch of these just for her. And if you’re looking for more ideas to thank your child’s teacher check out these ideas courtesy of Motherboard.

So what makes these so good? Chocolate. I know, that’s obvious, but we’re not talking just cocoa powder here or gobs of flour, the main ingredient in these brownies is the good stuff. And there are layers of chocolate–with the butter, mixed with the flour, the eggs. As with the best desserts–in my sweet tooth opinion–they’re better on day two when they’ve had a chance to densify (that’s a word we’ve invented just for these brownies; they’re airy on day #1, dense with dark chocolate day #2).

I bake these in a parchment-lined pan so I can easily lift them out and make perfect cuts and shapes with the brownies.

Recipe

Ingredients

1 ½ cups semi-sweet chocolate

1 ¼ cups sugar

12 Tablespoons butter

1 cup flour

1/3 cup cocoa

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

4 eggs, room temperature

2 teaspoons cocoa powder, Espresso powder, or black onyx powder

½ cup chocolate chips (optional, cuz there’s not enough chocolate already)

1 cup walnuts (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Melt the chocolate, sugar and butter together in a large glass bowl in the microwave, heating it at half power in 1-minute intervals. Cook just until you can stir to combine. Step aside to cool to room temperature.
  3. In a mixing bowl, beat the eggs together until frothy and all the Espresso powder.
  4. In another mixing bowl, mix all of the remaining dry ingredients (baking powder, salt, flour, cocoa) together.
  5. Add the cooled chocolate mixture to the egg mixture and beat to combine.
  6. Stir the flour mixture into the chocolate just until combined. Pour into prepared pan.
  7. Bake for 20-25 minutes in a 9×13” baking pan sprayed with cooking oil. Check for doneness by inserting a toothpick; when it comes out clean the brownies are done baking.

Optional directions for the perfectly cut brownie:

  1. Spray the 9×13” baking pan with spray and then add a sheet of either parchment or wax paper to the bottom of the pan, spray again. Pour the brownie batter onto the paper.
  2. Bake as directed above.
  3. Let the brownies cool and then place then in the refrigerator for at least an hour, preferably overnight.
  4. Lift the brownies out of the pan and then remove the pan underneath before placing on a cutting board.
  5. Use a sharp knife to remove the outside edges, then cut the brownies into 11/2 to 2” squares.
  6. Keep in the fridge for best, most intensely chocolatey results.
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Molten Chocolate Cakes

If you’re looking for the chocolate dessert to serve on Valentine’s Day—here you go. Velvety and smooth on the inside, moist on the outside, saturated with rich chocolate throughout, this recipe defines decadent. But it’s not hard to make. And it doesn’t take forever either (not to mention you can make it a day or two ahead).

There are a few tricks to getting this recipe right. See molten cakes are almost like a cross between a custard and a cheesecake (uh, both chocolate). So they don’t cook quite like a cake would where you need to make sure that it’s done all the way through. But I need to take a step back before we get to the baking.

Prepping your ramekins (custard cups). You’ll need to coat the inside of the ramekins with baking spray (or you could brush with melted butter) and then add about 1 teaspoon of flour. Move the flour around the inside until its coated. This is exactly like flouring a bread pan but it gets trickier when it’s a 4-ounce cup! Now you can do this with muffin tins, I’m told. I haven’t tried it that way, but if you don’t have ramekins, that’s an option. This is the hardest part of the whole recipe.

Here’s the second hardest: figuring out when the cakes are done. Like a cheesecake, when you check for doneness you want the center to just jiggle. If the batter appears completely solid you won’t have the gooey chocolate center that makes molten cakes, well, molten.

Okay, I take that back, there’s one more hard part (promise, once you get the hang of this the recipe isn’t nearly as complicated as it sounds). You have a few options with taking the cake out of the ramekin. Here’s what I do. I run a kitchen knife around the outside of the ramekin and then place the serving plate on top of it. Jiggle, then lift the ramekin. If the cake doesn’t seem to be releasing or it’s not releasing altogether, I try to put everything back into the ramekin, top it with whip cream and call it good. Or you can put the ramekin in the fridge for a while and then try inverting again. You can keep the dessert cold or put it in the microwave for 9 seconds.

Ready to start melting some chocolate? This recipe won’t disappoint.

Recipe

Prep time: 20 minutes + 10 minutes baking

Servings: 4

Ingredients

8 tablespoons butter

2 teaspoons flour

4 ounces chocolate (bittersweet is best but semi-sweet works too)

2 whole eggs

2 egg yolks

¼ sugar

½ teaspoon espresso powder (opt.)

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Lightly coat four, four-ounce ramekins with baking spray. Then place a small amount of flour in each one and make sure that the flour then coats the inside of the ramekin completely. Alternatively, you can use a muffin tin, but follow the same process.
  3. In a glass measuring cup or bowl, melt the butter and chocolate together in the microwave (I usually set it for 60 seconds and then stir vigorously).
  4. In a medium-sized mixing bowl beat the eggs and egg yolks on high for around three minutes or until they start to become thick.
  5. Add the sugar into the eggs and continue beating about three more minutes (the mixture will lighten slightly in color).
  6. Blend the eggs into the cooled chocolate mixture. Beat for about two more minutes.
  7. Place the ramekins on a cookie sheet.
  8. Pour equal parts of the chocolate mixture into each of the ramekins.
  9. Bake for 7 to 10 minutes, or until the chocolate barely jiggles on the center portion of each ramekin.
  10. Remove from the oven. Allow to cool for at least 10 minutes.
  11. At this point, you can either serve the chocolate cakes in the ramekins, or you can run a kitchen knife around the outside and invert onto a plate. You can also place the ramekins in the refrigerator and serve later cold or reheat for 10 seconds and then serve topped with whipped cream and dusted with cocoa powder.

Warning: These are rich!

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Mexican rice pudding

My kids convinced me to try rice pudding a few years ago. I thought I’d tried—and decided—as a child that I didn’t like rice pudding. Now, I’m not sure I ever even ate it as a kid.

Rice cooked in milk and peppered with raisins and cinnamon just didn’t sound like the right combination of flavors somehow. But every time we went to a Mexican restaurant, their dessert of choice would be ‘rice pudding.’ At first, I wasn’t impressed.

Then later when sneaking bites, I began to be intrigued. The flavors of the smooth rice and sweetened milk were comforting, soothing after a spicy meal. Unlike a chocolate treat that felt indulgent, this dessert tasted homey. I was hooked. Making rice pudding at home was another story. I tried a recipe that was done in the crockpot—that sounded promising (it tasted awful).

Another recipe called for cooked rice to be added to the milk instead of cooking the rice in the milk. I liked the idea of being able to use my leftover rice for the recipe, but in the end, the dish tasted nothing like what I’d come to love at restaurants. I finally stumbled on the recipe I was craving when a mother in one of my daughter’s school classes, who happened to be from Mexcio, brought in a snack for a room party. Rice pudding. I sampled it and sure enough, the rice was just the right texture with a hint of creaminess. She graciously passed along her recipe, which I’m now passing along to you.

Recipe

Ingredients

1 cup rice

4 cups water

1 cinnamon stick (or ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon)

Peel of one lime or lemon (alternatively use 1Tablespoon of zest)

1, 14-ounce can sweetened, condensed milk

2 egg yolks

1/4 cup raisins

Directions

  1. Rinse the rice in a colander under cold water until the rinsing water comes out clear on the other side. (This helps remove extra starch on the outside of the rice pieces.)
  2. Boil the water with the cinnamon stick and the fruit rind for about 2 to 3 minutes in a medium-sized cooking pan on the stovetop over medium-high heat.
  3. Add the rice to the water and cook over medium-high heat.
  4. In a separate bowl, mix the condensed milk and egg yolks with a fork.
  5. When the rice is cooked through but still firm, reduce the heat to low. Slowly add in the milk-egg mixture and raisins, stirring frequently for 3 to 4 minutes or until the rice is soft.
  6. Turn off the heat and cover the pan. Let the rice continue cooking and steaming for about 10 minutes or so.
  7. Remove the cinnamon stick and the fruit rind and serve. Rice pudding can be served warm or cold and sprinkled with a little cinnamon.
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Achatz Handmade Pie Co. Apple Pie Recipe

Apple Pie Recipe

Pie dough

Mix:

2-½ cup pastry flour

1-teaspoon sugar

1-teaspoon sea salt

Add:

½ cup all natural palm fruit oil

½ cup cold butter

Mix oil and butter into flour mixture with fingers until crumbly.

Add:

½ cup chilled water.

Do not over mix at this point. Dough will be sticky. Cover with plastic wrap or wax paper and allow to rest in refrigerator for 1 hour.

Divide dough in half. Roll out onto a lightly floured surface into an 11” circle to fit pie pan.

Filling

7 cups thinly sliced Northern Spy apples

½ c. sugar

¼ c. brown sugar

¼ c. flour

½-1 t. cinnamon

3 T. butter

Toss until apples are well coated; pour into bottom crust and dot with butter.

Roll out top dough disk, cover pie and crimp edges. Flute top crust for steam to escape while baking.

Brush top crust with water or egg and sprinkle with 2 T. sugar.

Bake at 375 degrees for 1-¼ hours or until golden brown and apple are tender.

If apples are not tender yet crust is becoming too dark, lower over temperature to 350 and continue to bake until apples are tender. Insert a fork into the middle of pie to test the tenderness of apple slices.

*Note that Wendy Achatz suggests using Northern Spy apples. I couldn’t find any at the grocery store so you might need to substitute another variety.

Special thanks for Wendy Achatz for sharing her recipe with MKES!

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Coconut Snowman Cookies–in 3D!

Snowmen cookies

Three different snowman frosting styles

Sure, you could make flat, sugar cookie snowmen, but why not enlist your kids in sculpting some three-dimensional ones? That’s what I did with this coconut snowball recipe. I let my kids roll the dough into 3 sizes of balls figuring we’d make a whole family of snow people.

Once the cookies had cooled slightly, we added a quick powdered sugar glaze and then more coconut. After the glaze had set, we added mini-chocolate chips for eyes and cut up fruit leathers for the “carrot” noses and scarves. Melted white chocolate made for perfect snowman glue.

I would love to claim this idea as my own, but really my kids insisted on doing something fun with the recipe. Seeing as in the last week we’ve had nonstop snow and 2–yes 2!–school snow days, I guess I’m not surprised. Plus the temperature is still so chilly that we can’t play outside. No wonder then that my kids were driven to make snowmen inside!

I wanted to try a few different ways to frost the snowmen–my older kids were patient enough to use the original recipe technique above, but younger kids might not be. 

So here are 3 frosting techniques I used, along with some notes.

Powdered sugar coated snowman

Frosting #1 Powdered Sugar

Good: Simple. You just roll the cookie balls in powdered sugar while they’re still warm.

Bad: This makes sticking on the mini-chocolate chip eyes much tougher.

Frosting #2 Powdered sugar glaze

Powdered sugar glaze snowman

Good: Add 2-4 teaspoons of milk to a cup of powdered sugar and stir. Place the cookie balls onto a wire tray with a cookie pan underneath. Pour the glaze over each ball. This is the LEAST messy technique.

Bad: The white chocolate glue is the most visible with this glaze. (Kids don’t seem to mind though.)

Glaze + coconut

Glaze + coconut snowman

Frosting #3 Glaze + ground coconut

Good: After you’ve glazed the snowman balls–and before the frosting sets–roll each one in coconut that has been pulsed in a food processor so that it’s nearly ground. This frosting turned out the prettiest snowmen and it masked any little errors (like too much white chocolate glue).

Bad: Messy. This is the recipe recommended version and these snowmen were the best of the batch. But you need to have patience to put these together.

*A batch of cookies will make for 5, 3-layered snowmen and 1 snow snake;)

This is just one of many cookie recipes you can find at Our Most Gorgeous Holiday Cookies Ever. I’ve been looking through the site as part of the Motherboard team. Once a week, I’ll be posting about the exciting things not to miss on the their site, and their affiliates. (If I have time this week, I really want to make the chocolate pinwheel cookie recipe. We’ll see:)

Are you making cookies for the holidays? What are some of your favorites?


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Zingier Cookie Bars

Raspberry barsI love holiday baking. Let me repeat I LOVE holiday baking. But I don’t always have time for it. Then my 12-year-old mentions she needs a plate of goodies for choir or I really want to give a baked present to a friend but I have about 30 minutes to make something decent–and yeah, I need to do a load of laundry in between.

My secret? A little zing can make any cookie bar better, whether you’ve made it from scratch or enlisted the help of Krusteaz or whatever boxed mix you happen to have on hand. (Nope, no sponsorship from Krusteaz here, I just really like their raspberry crumb bars.)

Here are a few tweaks that will make your cookie bars stand out–

•Zest: Lemons, limes, oranges, clementines, adding a little citrus zest to your crumble bar batter will give it an added tanginess. (Use about a teaspoon of zest for a small batch and zest the entire fruit for a cookie-pan sized batter.) Fun pairings: orange zest with chocolate, lemon zest with raspberry, lime zest with strawberry.

*Confused about how to zest? No worries. Click for the lowdown on zesting.

•Fruit slices: After you’ve zested the fruit, don’t just send it down the garbage disposal! Cut thin, circular slices of the fruit. Then cut a line from the outside of the fruit just barely toward the center. Twist the fruit slice and place it on top. Make sure to add the twists just before serving. Refrigerate them until you’re ready.

•Almond extract: My vanilla extract bottle has been gathering dust lately. I don’t know, it just doesn’t have enough oomph for me. But the smooth flavor of almond just screams holidays to me. So I’ve been putting almond extract in place of vanilla in every recipe.

•Nutmeg: Another flavor that will inspire you to start singing Christmas carols, any recipe that calls for cinnamon, go ahead and add some nutmeg (about 1/4-1/2 teaspoon). If you’re daring, toss a few shakes of ground ginger in the batter too. Nutmeg pairs perfectly with most recipes calling for oatmeal.

•Nuts: Pecans are pricier than other nuts so I usually only get them around the holidays. Looking for a less expensive option? Almond slivers. No need to chop them before you use them, just add a few slivers to one of your favorite bars to make it look a little fancier. Or what about cashews?

•Chocolate: Okay, if you read my blog regularly you know I’ll use any excuse to add a little chocolate, but try something different–like mini-chips or chunks instead of your regular variety.

Shaped raspberry cookie bar

If only I had a star cookie cutter!

And to make your cookie bars really stand out, forget the bar! Refrigerate the cooked bars for about 1 hour and then instead of cutting, use a cookie cutter to make different shapes (warning: you’ll get fewer bars this way, but your kids will love having the job of eating the extras.)

Ready to get baking? Check out these recipes for the Best Cookie Bars. I’ve been looking through the site as part of the Motherboard team. Once a week, I’ll be posting about the exciting things not to miss on the their site, and their affiliates. (The peanutty buckeye bars are on my list to make:)

What about you? Do you have any hints for making your cookie bars even more tasty?

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