Posts tagged main dish

Japanese Pork Tonkatsu

tonkatsu

Photo credit: taekwonweirdo

In every culture there seems to be some version of breaded, fried meat. In Italy, there’s veal parmigiana; in Mexico, steak doused with bread crumbs is called milanesa; in Germany, cooks use crumbs from dried Kaiser rolls to make wiener schnitzel; I suppose chicken-fried steak could count as America’s contribution to this category. In Japan, thin slices of pork are battered with panko crumbs then fried to create tonkatsu.

Last November, a friend invited me over to a pre-Thanksgiving meal where she was teaching how to cook a traditional roasted turkey, stuffing and, of course, pumpkin pie to friends of hers from Japan. Her friends knew as many English words as I knew Japanese, which amounted to two—‘thank you’ (arigato) and ‘hello’ (konnichiwa).  But once we started rolling out pie crusts, we found a common language, food. (It helped that my friend was fluent in both Japanese and English.)

As a thank-you for the afternoon of all things Thanksgiving, my friend and I were invited over for some Japanese instruction a month later. Of all the things we cooked and sampled that day (I don’t think I’ll ever have a taste for mochi balls, but the sweet bean paste was tasty), the pork tonkatsu became a favorite for our family.

You make tonkatsu as you might other breaded meats, with a few key differences. Thin slices of pork are dredged in flour, then whisked eggs, then panko bread crumbs. Using the right bread crumbs is key—panko crumbs are not only crustless, but they’re lighter than American bread crumbs, making for a crispier coating. You can find panko in the Asian food aisle of just about any area grocery store.

Serve the tonkatsu over steamed white rice and veggies. Traditionally, there’s also a ketchup-like sauce served alongside. While it’s known as ‘Tonkatsu sauce’ my Japanese foodie friends call it ‘Bull-dog’ because that’s one of the more popular brands in Japan. While some grocers carry Bull-dog, you might have to go to an Asian grocery store to track it down. It’s worth making the trip—the combination of the sweet/sour Bull-dog sauce, crisp-fried pork and rice makes for a meal my kids ask for again and again.

Recipe

Prep time: 30 minutes + 20-30 minutes cooking

Serving: 5 + leftovers

Ingredients

1.5-2 pound pork loin

3 eggs

½ Tablespoon soy sauce

1 cup flour

1 bag panko bread crumbs (usually around 7.4 ounces)

Oil for frying

Directions

  1. In three shallow dishes or plates, prepare the following (I find pie plates work nicely). One dish with 1 cup flour. Whisk the eggs with soy sauce and pour into a separate plate. On the final plate place half the bag of panko crumbs.
  2. On a cutting board, slice the pork loin into small pieces, about ¼” thick.
  3. On a clean cutting board lay a couple pieces of pork between two sheets of plastic wrap. Gently pound the meat until the slice becomes slightly thinner. Repeat with the remaining meat slices.
  4. Working with one pork slice at a time, dredge the piece in flour, then lightly tap off excess, then dip it into the egg mixture and finally the panko. Place the battered meat slice onto a baking sheet.
  5. Repeat with the remaining slices of pork.
  6. Pour oil up to ½ an inch in a cooking pan. Heat to medium-high heat (test using a crumb of panko—it should start to sizzle when place in the oil).
  7. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees.
  8. Gently place 2 or 3 battered pork slices into the prepared oil, fry for 3 to 4 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Remove the meat from the oil onto a cookie sheet fitted with a wire rack to drain off excess oil.
  9. Place in the warm oven while you fry the rest of the meat slices. Cut into long strips and serve over rice (this also makes for excellent leftovers—if you have any!).
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Halloween Meatball Mice

Warning: These little critters look like, well, real little critters.

I had a vague idea of creating meatballs that looked like mice as a Halloween gag for my kids. I mentioned the idea to my husband, stuck him with the ingredients and then headed out to pick up my oldest daughter at a trick-or-treat party. When I returned, my younger two children were just giggling and my husband had a mischievous smirk on his face.

“They look so gross,” he said.

Now, you should know that when left alone my husband can come up with some pretty inventive creations. A few years ago he disappeared into the garage after asking where I’d stashed some black fabric we had leftover from one of my daughter’s witch costumes. Jump to a couple hours later and he’d crafted a giant black widow spider using old wiring, a deflated basketball, the fabric and some red paint. Seriously, the spider was about 6 feet across! He positioned the spider just above our front door and of course added webs all around. The 5 year-old living two doors down refused to walk on our side of the street in the week leading up to Halloween and she didn’t even stop by our house for candy.

Back to the mice roasting in my oven—here’s what my husband did, enlisting my daughters as helpers. He molded the meatball mixture into mice bodies (think teardrop-shaped) then he cut tails using slivers of deli ham. Olive pieces make up the eyes and once the meatballs were done baking he coated each one with spaghetti sauce.

Ready for a yucky dinner? Hey, only in appearance, they tasted delicious.

Directions for Mice Meatballs

Prep time: 25 minutes + 25 minutes baking

Servings: Around 5-6

Ingredients:

Meatball or meatloaf fixings

Spaghetti sauce

Spaghetti

Deli ham slices

Black olives

Using your favorite meatball or meatloaf recipe, mix together the meat and spice combination. [In this recipe cut out the vinegar, mustard, and Worcestershire sauce and add a teaspoon of dried oregano or basil to the meat mixture.]

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Lightly coat a baking pan with cooking spray.

Working with about 2 ½ to 3 tablespoons of meat, form the mixture into a teardrop shape.

Line up the meatballs in rows on the baking sheet.

Thinly slice the deli ham into “tails.” Press a “tail” into the back end of each meatball.

Add fingernail-sized piece of cut black olives next to the “nose” part of the meatball. Press into place. Repeat with all of the meatballs.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until the meat is cooked through.

Make the spaghetti noodles according to the package directions.

Brush warmed spaghetti sauce over each “mouse.”

Serve 2 or 3 mice meatballs over the spaghetti noodles and top with additional sauce.

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Calzones done right

CalzonePizza gets old. Trust me, I’m a pizza fan, but sometimes I like to tweak the ingredients into something just a little bit different. Hey, I’m not the only one–calzones certainly seem like an excuse to reinvent pizza.

Calzones, with their pizza-like dough that’s folded over yummy ingredients like Italian sausage and mozzarella cheese, do seem an awful lot like a handheld pizza. But what I like about calzones is the excuse to dive into the fridge and uncover fun ingredients to toss in. Roasted veggies on hand? Make a roasted veggie and cheddar cheese calzone. Pesto and leftover chicken? Throw in some Parmesan and mozzarella, even a little baby spinach, and you have a tasty pesto calzone. (This time we made sausage and veggie calzones and the veggie variety were my husband’s favorite!)

You can cut down the prep time for calzones and buy pizza dough from the grocery store, but where’s the fun in that? Yes, calzones do take some time to make, but if you use your food processor, it goes pretty quick.

Hint #1 I always, always double the recipe and freeze some of the extra calzones to use for lunches or a quick dinner later. Making a big batch of dough also means that I have to get creative—who wants 12 calzones all with the same filling? I let my kids come up with whatever cheese and meat or cheese and veggie—or more likely cheese, meat and veggie–combo for their calzones.

Hint #2 Only put a couple tablespoons of sauce—tops—into the calzone! Putting in too much sauce makes for a soggy calzone. Serve heated up spaghetti sauce, alfredo or pesto sauce along with the calzones and let your kids dip instead of trying to tuck the sauce inside.

Hint #3 Let the calzones rest after they’ve baked for at least 15 minutes. These come out hot. Your kids will like them a lot better if the calzones have had time to cool down.

Hint #4 Calzones make for easy breakfasts. You can even eat them cold!

Recipe

Inspired by a recipe that first appeared in Cuisine at Home.

Prep Time: 30 minutes + rising time of 1 ½ hours

Servings: 4-6

1 cup warm water

1 yeast packet

¼ teaspoon sugar or honey

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

1 ½ cups bread flour (optional, or just use more all-purpose flour)

1 Tablespoon sugar or honey

2 teaspoons salt

Filling ingredients (mix and match a meat and cheese—or 2!)

1 pound Cooked Italian sausage

1-2 cups Mozzarella cheese

½ cup Parmesan cheese

½ to 1 cup Ricotta Cheese

Dash of salt and pepper

Other possible ingredients

Diced ham

Roasted veggies

Prepared spaghetti sauce (for dipping and to include with the filling)

Directions

In a large measuring cup or small mixing bowl, put the first 3 ingredients into the bowl and whisk vigorously. Let this mixture sit for around 6 to 10 minutes or until you see bubbles forming (the bubbles show that the yeast is active and that your dough will rise, yeah!). After the mixture has stood and bubbled, go ahead and add in the oil.

In a food processor (you could do this with a standing mixer or a handheld mixer, but it’s easiest in the processor), pulse together your flours, 1 Tablespoon sugar and salt. Just a note on the flours, bread flour will make the dough stiffer and the finished calzone crispier. I’ve found that using all bread flour makes the dough too hard to roll out. The 50/50 combo works perfectly. Once these ingredients are blended, run the machine as you pour in the yeast mixture. The batter should come together to form a ball (this should only take a few seconds).

Spray a large mixing bowl with oil. What I do is let the dough rest in the food processor while I clean out the mixing bowl. I towel dry it and then spray it with oil. Not only does taking a minute to clean out the bowl make for less mess, but the bowl is also slightly warm when I put the dough in it, making it rise that much more.

Remove the dough ball from the food processor and onto a lightly floured cutting board. Gently knead the dough a few times until it’s no longer sticky and feels smooth.

Place the kneaded dough ball into the oiled mixing bowl and cover with plastic wrap that you’ve also lightly sprayed with cooking oil.

Let rise for 1 hour.

After rising, punch down once and then place the dough ball onto a lightly floured cutting board. Divide the dough with a sharp knife or pastry cutter into 6 pieces. Form the 6 pieces into balls and then place them on a lightly oiled baking pan. Cover the pieces with a slightly damp cooking towel. Let them rise for 30 more minutes while you prep the filling ingredients.

Preheat your oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit (yup, that’s hot!).

Lightly spray a 9 x 13” baking pan with cooking oil and then sprinkle with cornmeal to prevent the dough from sticking to the pan.

In a bowl, mix a combination of your selected ingredients. For example, 1 pound Italian sausage plus 1 to 2 cups mozzarella cheese, ½ cup Parmesan, ¼ pound diced ham or replace the sausage with diced, roasted veggies. I also like to add ½ to 1 cup ricotta cheese and 1 tablespoon of prepared spaghetti sauce. So get creative with the calzone fillings!

One at a time, take one of the dough pieces and using a rolling pin make a circle ¼” thick on a floured cutting board. Move the dough onto another floured cutting board for filling. Place about ½ to ¾ of a cup filling into the center of the dough circle. Pull one end of the dough over to meet the other side. With your finger, place a little bit of water onto the inside edge of the dough circle to seal.

Use the edge of a fork to make indents into the sealed end of the dough. (So now that your circle is a half circle, the curved side.) Place the filled calzone onto the prepared baking dish and prepare the rest of the dough pieces using the same process.

Lightly brush the calzones with olive oil before placing them in the oven.

Cook for 10 to 15 minutes or until the calzone are lightly browned at the edges. Let the calzones rest for at least 15 minutes before serving. Heat spaghetti sauce to serve with the calzones.

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Easy roasted veggies–2 ways

Photo credit: greg.turner

We’ve been living on roasted veggies these days. Red potatoes, parsnips, sweet potatoes, purple potatoes, onions, even red peppers have been making it onto the baking pan and filling the house with yummy smells. (Forget turning on the heater–something cooking in the oven is my favorite way to heat up the house!)

Below, I’ve included the basic recipe for roasting veggies. I usually double this recipe and make enough to have leftovers for lunch and to include in other meals.

Lately, we’ve used roasted veggies in place of meat to make:

-Nachos

-Calzones

-Burritos

-Enchiladas

-Pita pizzas

They’re so easy the only hang-up is they take time to roast. But double the recipe (using two pans!) and you can have enough to last for two or three meals.

Recipe #1–Diced

Servings: 4-5

Prep time: 20 minutes + 40-50 minutes cooking time

Ingredients

2 pounds red potatoes (or your favorite although I’ve found red are best for roasting)

1 pound carrots

1 small onion

1 pound optional (sweet potatoes, parsnips, purple potatoes, Yukon Gold potatoes)

Cooking spray

Salt to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Generously coat a large cookie sheet with cooking spray.
  3. Wash and dry your veggies. Dice the veggies into dime-sized pieces (I always leave the skin on the potatoes–makes it easier and better for you). Keep the onions separate.
  4. Place the veggies onto the sprayed cookie sheet (except the onions or peppers if you’re using them). Spray again and sprinkle with salt (if desired, they’re good without).
  5. Place in the heated oven for 10 minutes. Remove, add the onions, and return to the oven. (I find if I put in the onions from the start that they become too browned.)
  6. Roast for 30 to 40 minutes or until the potatoes are just browned. Let the veggies cool for at least 5 minutes before serving.

Recipe #2–Whole

Lately, I’ve found small, whole potatoes (often called fingerling) at the grocers. With these potatoes the prep is even easier.

Ingredients:

2 pounds small potatoes

1 small onion, cut thick

Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Generously coat a large cookie sheet with cooking spray.
  3. Wash and dry your veggies. Keep the onions separate.
  4. Place the whole veggies onto the sprayed cookie sheet (except the onions). Spray again and sprinkle with salt (if desired, they’re good without).
  5. Place in the heated oven for 10 minutes. Remove, add the onions, and return to the oven. (I find if I put in the onions from the start that they become too browned.)
  6. Roast for 30 to 40 minutes or until the potato skins begin to blister (you’ll even hear them popping). Let the veggies cool for at least 5 minutes before serving.

*Note: these are also good sprinkled with dried rosemary.

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Grilled Chicken Rollups

My husband will grill no matter what the temperature or weather. In a downpour a few days ago, he was out there flipping chicken and trying to check the grill without lifting the lid more than an inch or so. Still, we both like when the weather becomes just a little nippy to heat up the grill—not too hot, not too cold outside. The kids can play while we sit and talk together. Welcome to October.

And since we’ve been grilling all summer long—and the temperatures are beginning to dip—the same recipes just won’t do. Forget the shish kabobs and the teriyaki chicken, I want something heartier. Instead of grilled chicken breast, we add a twist by rolling and stuffing the chicken breast—the technique adds some ‘umph’ to the chicken, infuses it with flavor and also just turns out really cool. (You’ll notice I’m using ‘we’ here—I’m the idea, prep person when it comes to grilling, my hubby is the master griller.)

You can stuff your chicken with just about anything. We’ve done ham and swiss cheese for a grilled chicken cordon bleu, peppers and onions, but our favorite combo is simply sausage (like the fully cooked link variety) and some sharp cheddar cheese. Before you stuff the chicken, you’ll need to pound it out thin. Then you can roll up your stuffing ingredients—and here’s the tricky part—secure the roll with either a long toothpick or even a metal skewer. (Just don’t forget to remove these before serving!)

The rolled chicken may need a little more time to cook on the grill then a flatter piece of meat, but if you have an instant read thermometer where you can just pull the chicken off the grill and do a quick reading, that will make checking for doneness a snap. So don’t put the grill away just yet!

Recipe

Servings: 4

Prep time: 25 minutes + grilling time

Ingredients:

4-5 boneless, skinless chicken breasts

1 package sausage links (such as Hillshire Farm)

4 ounces sharp cheddar cheese

On hand:

Garlic powder

Onion powder

Salt

Pepper

2 Tablespoons melted butter

½ Tablespoon soy sauce

long toothpicks

Directions:

Using two pieces of doubled plastic wrap, place one chicken breast in between and onto a sturdy cutting board. Pound the chicken gently with a hammer until it’s about ¼” thick. Set aside. Repeat with each chicken breast.

Cut up the sausage into several 2-inch long pieces, do the same with the cheddar cheese. Placing 3-4 pieces each of sausage and cheese at the end of one piece of chicken, roll the chicken, starting with the filling end, toward the other end. Make sure you are rolling on the short end of the chicken, not the wider side. Secure the roll by poking a long toothpick into the meat and thread it through once. Repeat with each chicken breast. Generously sprinkle seasonings on each chicken breast. Use garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper.

Heat the grill to medium-high heat. Prepare a finishing sauce for the meat by whisking the soy sauce into the butter. Place the chicken seam side up onto the hot grill. Cook for 15-25 minutes. Remember to baste the chicken frequently with the finishing sauce and flip once. When you think the meat is done, remove one chicken breast and check the internal temperature with an instant-read thermometer—it should read 165 degrees. Alternatively, cut into one chicken breast and check that the meat is no longer pink.

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Thai Bistro’s: BBQ Ribs

Photo credit: Barron

Ingredients:
2 1/2 lb. baby back ribs
2 tsp. thin soy sauce
1 1/2 tsp. brown sugar
1 tsp. sesame oil
1 tsp. oyster sauce
2 Tbsp. red wine
Pinch of black pepper
Chinese broccoli or spinach (side)

Directions:

  1. Clean ribs and cut into five or six pieces.
  2. Mix all ingredients well and marinate for 1-2 hours.
  3. Add 1/2 cup of water and mix well.
  4. Put ribs in a baking dish and bake at 400 degrees F for 30 minutes.
  5. Serve with stir-fried Chinese broccoli or spinach.
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No Need for Beef Bean Burgers

Bean burgers sounded like a bit of a stretch for me—I mean, how do you get them to stay together? And truth be told, I’m not a burger fan. (Shhhh! Don’t tell Mr. Squid, he makes great burgers, but for me it’s still always about getting great toppings that make a burger worth eating no matter if it’s ground sirloin or chuck.)

When I started looking through various black bean burger recipes I realized a couple of things—first that they were constructed a lot like meatballs with bread crumbs and an egg to hold them together and second that bean patties are common. Who knows, maybe falafels, those balls of ground, fried chickpeas often wrapped in a warm pita, were the inspiration for black bean burgers.

Here’s what I didn’t like about the recipes I came across—why no ‘bean fushion’? I like black beans but what about adding in a few red beans or pinto? The flavoring in black bean burgers seemed fairly expected too, garlic and onions, onions and garlic, sometimes sautéed and sometimes added raw. I figure if you’re already using beans for your burger you should make it a southwest burger with enough spice and heat to distinguish it from it’s beefy cousin.

No problem getting the kids to eat bean burgers!

So instead of bread crumbs as I binder, I used ground up tortilla chips and I didn’t even bother with onions and garlic, I spiced it as I might a burger with onion powder, garlic powder and then chili powder. I also tossed in a little mayo to hold it together; to brighten the flavor even more I added plenty of fresh chopped cilantro. As for the beans, I decided on a black-pinto combo.

The results? I really wasn’t expecting to like the bean burgers much (I mean, it is still a burger). But the crisped patties melded together with the vivid flavors of beans, cilantro, southwest spices and corn won me over. My kids too. My husband even had seconds, and said—I kid you not—“I like these better than regular burgers.”

Have you tried bean burgers?

Recipe
Servings: 8, 3-inch burgers
Prep + Cooking time: About an hour


Ingredients
1 15.5 oz can black beans (drained)
2 15.5 oz cans pinto beans (drained; you’ll only use half of the second can)
1 cup corn chips, ground (measured after grinding)
1 egg
2 tablespoons mayo
½ teaspoon onion powder
½ teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon chili powder
¼ teaspoon cayenne
Salt and pepper to taste
Slices of cheese, optional
Oil


Directions

  1. In a food processor, grind the corn chips and then set aside in a large bowl.
  2. Drain all of the beans. Process 1 can of pinto beans until smooth. Add to the corn chips in the separate bowl.
  3. Again, in the food processor, pulse the remaining pinto beans (remember half of the can; the rest you can save for another recipe) and half of the black beans until chunky but NOT pureed. Two or three pulses should do it.
  4. Add the chunky pinto and black bean mixture to the corn and pureed bean mixture. Add the remaining ingredients (except the rest of the black beans) and stir.
  5. Add in the whole black beans to the rest of the bean mixture and stir gently. The mixture will be loose.
  6. On a baking sheet covered with parchment paper, form three inch in diameter, one-inch thick patties. Place on the baking sheet and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  7. In a large skillet bring three tablespoons of oil to medium-high heat. Gently add the firmed patties to the oil and sauté on one side for about 4 minutes and then flip over gently and sauté the next side for 4 minutes or until crisped. You should be able to fit four patties into the pan at a time.
  8. Replace the parchment on the baking sheet and put the sautéed patties onto the sheet. Add a slice of cheese to the top (I used Monterrey Jack, but you can use whatever your family prefers). Melt the cheese in an oven preheated to 375 degrees Fahrenheit for about 7 to 10 minutes while you prep the rest of the burger ingredients.
  9. Serve the burgers on bun with lettuce, tomato, and onion. I also added a chipotle mayo to the bun top for some extra heat.
  10. Enjoy!
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Kids Eating….sauteed spinach

I love spinach nearly as much as I do dark chocolate. Seriously, when there was the E. Coli outbreak back in 2006 linked to bagged spinach I felt like I went through leafy green withdrawl (so sad to see it stripped from all the grocery store shelves—if only I were a decent gardener!). Romaine lettuce, iceberg, butter lettuce, they’re okay, but the thick heft and chewiness of leaf of spinach, simply tasty.

Not so for my kids. “This tastes like you’re eating leaves,” my oldest said once. “Well… you are,” I explained. Of course, that didn’t make her any more eager to eat it. So I add spinach into my foods, but I don’t push it with my girls.

Sometimes, it’s all about the recipe. The other day I had a duel challenge—my kids aren’t huge gnocchi fans and well, you already know their thoughts on my favorite veggie. But I wanted a meal with both. I made them plain pasta and for my husband and me I tried something new. For each of my girls I put a little of my new creation on their plates and expected to eat their leftovers later. No leftovers. In fact, my two oldest girls went back for seconds—we’re talking sautéed spinach here. And it wasn’t a fluke. I made the recipe again this week and sure enough they ate it. I wish I could say the recipe was something terribly creative and unique, but taking a few extra steps was what made the dish yummy. That and I didn’t try to tweak it for my girls, I just made something I wanted to eat.

My daughter with a second helping

*Note—for this recipe I tried a stir-fry technique with Italian food. I sauteed the veggies first (the spinach) and moved it to the sides of the pan as you would in a wok. Then I add the main ingredient (the gnocchi) to the center of the pan and then tossed in my sauce ingredients. Couldn’t have been simpler and less mess to clean up too.

Fast & Easy Creamy Sauteed Spinach with Ricotta and Fontina Gnocchi

Ingredients

1 17.6 ounce package gnocchi

4 cups spinach

1 cup ricotta

¾ cup fontina

1 clove garlic

1 1/2 Tablespoons olive oil, separated

ground pepper and salt to taste

2 Tablespoons either half and half or cream (optional)

Fresh, chopped basil (optional)

Directions

Cook the gnocchi according the package directions.

Add the olive oil to a large sauté pan and bring to medium-high heat. Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds before adding the spinach (I don’t even bother pulling them into smaller pieces I just throw them whole into the pan). Cook for 2 to 3 minutes or just until the spinach leaves just barely begin to wilt. Push the spinach to the outer sides of the pan and add another ½ tablespoon of oil. Add the cooked gnocchi to the middle of the pan. Let the gnocchi cook for about 4 minutes before moving them around.

Now that the gnocchi have had time to sauté, turn the heat down to medium. Add the ricotta cheese in dollops on top of the gnocchi and sprinkle with the cheese.  Don’t mix the ingredients until you see cheese just beginning to melt. Sprinkle with pepper and salt, stir briefly until the cheeses mix with the rest of the ingredients. For a creamier sauce you can add a few tablespoons half and half or heavy cream at this point. You can also toss in fresh basil, Parmesan cheese and/or a few red pepper flakes. Serve.

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Oven-Seared Amish-Raised Chicken “Chop” with Morel Sauce

Oven-Seared Amish-Raised Chicken Chop
Decadent & creative

Oven Seared Amish Raised Chicken “Chop” with Morel Sauce
Nick Seccia CEC
Serves 6

Chicken Chop
Ingredients

6 Airline cut Amish raised chicken breast 6-8oz ea
6 Slices thick cut hickory smoked bacon
1/4 Cup pure olive oil
2 Cloves garlic peeled
2 Tablespoons fresh parsley
2 Tablespoon fresh thyme
2 Tablespoons fresh basil leaves
2 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 Tablespoon organic apple cider vinegar
1/2 Tablespoon Kosher salt
1/2 Tablespoon ground black pepper
Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients except chicken and bacon, puree in a blender
  2. Remove the meat and skin from around the bone on the chicken
  3. Pour marinade over the chicken and marinate overnight
  4. Place chicken skin side down flat with the bone pointing away from you then roll the thin edge towards the chicken until rolled into a chop shape
  5. Stand chicken up so the bone is straight up then wrap the bacon around the bottom
  6. Roast at 350F for about 35 to 40 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through
  7. Serve with morel sauce

Morel Sauce
Ingredients

1 cup fresh Morel mushrooms sliced in half lengthwise and cleaned
1 large shallot minced
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 tablespoons brandy
1 cup roasted veal stock reduced from 2 cups
1/4 cup heavy cream
Kosher salt and ground black pepper as needed
Directions

  1. Saute the mushrooms and shallots in butter until the shallots are clear and the mushrooms are tender
  2. Add the brandy and reduce until almost dry
  3. Add the stock and heavy cream reduce until thickened
  4. Season with salt and pepper
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